Some Thoughts on Inter-religious Dialogue

Of late I have been following a controversy recently created and stirred up by professing Christians among the “right” in U.S. politics. This controversy primarily surrounds one event (taking place over the course of two evenings) started and participated in by Dr. James White – specifically a dialogue that Dr. White had with a Muslim imam named Yasir Qadhi – and unfortunately the critics focus most of their attention on lambasting and slandering the persons involved. I wish to avoid that end of the controversy, however, and address the views that are being promoted by the critics where it involves how a Christian should interact with unbelievers – particularly members of other religions.

(Side NOTE: the dialogues in question can be found at these links: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=updtj99Fp80 & https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=r2tPHLOej1w . . . For those interested in being better able to share the Gospel with Muslims, I would highly recommend them)

Now, one of the more reasonable arguments I’ve heard from the critics of the dialogues has been pulled from Scripture by referencing 2 John 7-11. Their argument is basically that a public meeting, for the purpose of merely discussing certain issues, should never be held among Christians and people of another faith – because that would violate the spirit of the passage referenced. (Their argument particularly centers around a very fearful view of Islam, however I believe my summary captures the essence of the argument.)

The first thing the reader should note about the passage mentioned – and many like it (e.g. Romans 16:17-18, 2 Thessalonians 3:6 & 14, etc.) – is that the author is primarily warning followers of Christ away from the poison of those who practice and believe things that go against the teachings of Christ. The context of many of Scripture’s warnings against false teaching is false teaching and practice that tries to claim to be Christian.

Put another way, Scripture’s concern is to keep disciples away from false doctrine that claims to be in the same vein as what Christ would teach. It does not necessarily address false religions that do not associate themselves with Christianity, possibly because it is easier to recognize that they are not of God.

However, the strong language against the apostate does not necessarily correlate to assuming the disciples of Christ should treat the unbeliever with the same severity (at least, not at all times). In fact, I would say the actions of Jesus, Paul, and the other apostles is reason enough to think that we should regularly be interacting with the lost. 2 Thessalonians 3:8 implies their having worked daily among unbelievers as well as believers; the whole book of Acts would give examples – but Acts 17:16-21 is a pointed example; and obviously Jesus spent much time with people who He knew would end up deserting Him – John 6:64-66. Now, I have heard one radio talk show host complain not so much about the conversation but the “official public format” of the dialogues participated in by Dr. White and Dr. Qadhi. My question, however, is how is a public format any different than the examples cited? Other than the fact that more people get to learn and participate in the format used by Dr. White?

Lastly, unfortunately it seems this whole thing has become a controversy because so many Republicans in America fear (and sometimes despise) Muslims, and that extends into American Christianity because of how it identifies itself with Republicanism. I would encourage the reader not to make that mistake – a Christian’s politics might primarily be conservative (because of being affected by Scripture), but that does not mean the views or position of the “conservative right” are by default Christian.

“For God gave us a spirit not of fear but of power and love and self-control.” ~ 2 Timothy 1:7 (ESV)

No disciple of Christ should fear anyone of any ideology or religion that sets itself up against God. Take courage, Christian, and share the Gospel with your neighbor (Muslim or otherwise) and treat them with love and respect as you do so.

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God’s Not Dead 2 – A Brief Review

There are very few movies that I come away from truly appreciating in its entirety: theme, message, presentation, and individual parts (that last bit is practically impossible for anyone to get from me)… but I have to say, “God’s Not Dead 2” certainly did a far better job than many “Christian” movies of late. First, I appreciated the somewhat more realistic and down to earth dealing with the American system and how our culture views the Religion of Christ. Though there was some typical “cliche-ish” “christianese” that was given through some of the beginning of the film, once we got into the meat of the “court case,” the writer(s?) did an excellent job addressing the imbalance of our country’s judicial system in weighing against Christianity for the sake of a few “offended” adherents to a different worldview.

I also liked the “uncertainty” of the ending. I won’t spoil anything for those who haven’t seen it 😉 – but let’s just say it was incredibly in line with what we (as Christians) can expect from our government in the near future…

I appreciated the simple character of the teacher (I forget her name) that we follow throughout the film. And I especially liked that her lawyer/defender was not a Christian – just someone who “hated to lose” and was fairly objective throughout the film. Frankly, I thought his (the lawyer’s) part was one of the better “bridge” pieces I’ve ever seen in a “hopefully engaging/interesting for all sides” part in any Christian movie I’ve ever seen.

Overall, I very much appreciated the last “I call ___ to the stand” scene, and thought they did a decent job on the overall film.

My only “face palm” complaint is the silly/unnecessary inclusion of the band “Newsboys” in the film, just because they were in the first one and to increase viewer interest (if it even accomplished that).

That said, I would recommend the film to anyone interested in a thought-provoking film that touches upon the freedom of religion and education in the U.S.